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Posts Tagged ‘Paresh Rawal’

Doli Saja Ke Rakhna (India, 1998)

My rating: +2 (Loved it)
Bechdel Test:
2 out of 3 (possibly you could say there’s a conversation between two mothers that is not entirely about men, but since it’s mainly about an upcoming wedding which does involve a man, I’m not going to count it)
Director: Priyadarshan
Music:
A.R. Rahman
Cast
Akshaye KhannaJyothikaAnupam Kher, Amrish Puri, Paresh Rawal, Moushumi Chatterjee, Aruna Irani
Plot: A love story in which the lovers’ families very violently show their dissapproval.

About the film

Bollywood (particularly in the 1990s) has done a lot of melodramatic beating scenes – the hero proving his love by getting beaten up to a pulp and that sort of thing. I get a bizarre sort of enjoyment out of them. There’s probably many strange reasons for this (and judging by how popular this theme is, I can’t be the only one). But I think my love of melodrama and dislike of the whole macho ideal play into this a lot.
This film doesn’t disappoint on that count 😉 The hero and in some scenes also his sidekicks go through a loooot of beatings and other indignities. There’s a beautiful fantasy dance sequence in which the heroine is reading a novel and imagining herself as the princess and the hero as the peasant boy. Even in this fantasy, the hero must go through a certain amount of indignity and violence before he gets the girl –  the sultan-like figure sentences him to death and the hero is trussed up and blindfolded as he awaits his beheading.
I really enjoy watching Akshaye Khanna getting beaten up on screen (weird, but true).  Like with everything else he does – he’s very earnest in those scenes. There’s no attempt to make the scenes more dignified, he just earnestly goes through with them and for me there’s something very beautiful about that.

But the beatings aren’t the only highlight of the film 😉 It features one of the most wonderfully awkward first date scenes ever. They end up talking about the weather and have amazing lines like “Do you watch weather forecasts?”. The date is interrupted just as the hero decides he must show the heroine some grass seeds and is crawling on his hands and knees in front of her, trying to find some.
The second date doesn’t disappoint on wonderfully awkward lines either (Inder tries to find out how she feels about kissing).

I really appreciate the scene in which the hero asks her if she loves him back. A lot of the time in Bollywood the hero assumes that if he tries hard enough he will win the girl over, so he doesn’t necessarily ask or take a no answer seriously. Inder asks and there’s a sense that if Pallavi says no, he will walk away from the relationship, even though he’s completely stricken with her and has by this point already taken some nasty beatings from her brothers.

What really stunned me though is the second half of the film.  It has many of the problems that second halves of 90s Bollywood romances usually do. The first half tends to be there for them to fall in love and set up the drama that will make their love difficult. The second is when all the family drama comes together with lots of soap operaish melodrama and far-fetched scenarios.
Dola Saja Ke Rakhna is the first film I’ve seen that has all of that non-sensical second half drama happening and yet it didn’t bother me. If anything, I got a bigger emotional kick out of the second half than I did from the first.
SPOILER ALERT! (select the whitespace to view the text) In the middle of the second half, the lovers make a rather unusual decision. Having eloped together after some nasty happenings, they then change their minds and decide to give up on their love and return to their families. The scene in which they talk this over is really intense. By this point they’ve been completely shunned by both their families and both are heart-broken at the thought of having to remain away from their families for the rest of their lives. When the heroine asks the question “Should we separate?”  it’s an amazing moment. What’s even more amazing is that in some ways they separate out of love for each other – they don’t want to see the other partner so unhappy. And if the English subtitles are to be believed, they even use the word “possessive” to describe the love of their families when they try to make sense of why all of this is happening to them. For me it was a really beautiful scene and an amazing contrast of two kinds of loves – the possessive kind their families feel for them and the pure, non-possessive kind they feel for each other.
And then there’s the scene towards the end of the film that blew me away. The heroine is serving drinks to both her own and Inder’s families. Finally, just one glass remains on the tray – she has to take it to Inder and face him in front of everybody without being able to express any of the love they’ve given up on. It’s a very awkward moment. A lot of discomfort passes through the room. All the two of them do is look at each other, but it’s so so beautiful and so much emotion passes between them.
Eventually, the families do finally recognise their children’s love for what it is. It turns out that just as the two lovers didn’t want to make each other unhappy by separating from their families, their families don’t want to make the two of them unhappy either. It’s a very convoluted path to get to a happy ending! END SPOILER

Like with most 90s Bollywood films, the film has that air of a low budget and poor production quality. That said, it is actually better quality than the average film of that era. They certainly had some very good ideas for shots and cuts.
One of my personal favourites is the first beating Inder and his two sidekicks receive. It’s quite unusual to do a beating scene in one shot, but that’s how they play it out. The camera shoots the action on one particular bit of wall. One after the other, each of the three people receiving the beating get thrown at that wall and then hit with enough “force” to remove them from the frame. Each of them has their shirt in a different state of disarray when they appear in shot which IMO adds to the whole choreography of it somehow. It’s nicely done.

The music in this film is a bit of a disappointment. I have a soft spot for A.R. Rahman – he really does help movies come to life, even when he’s not at his best (as is the case in this film). Nonetheless, the soundtrack does have an air of having been quickly put together. The music in this film was, apparently, originally used by A.R. Rahman in a Tamil movie and simply reused here.

Finally, most of the acting is of really high standard in this film. Unfortunately, I think the writing isn’t of high enough standard to really show off the skills of the actors 😛 But if you look beyond the writing and Bollywood clichés then there are some interesting performances.
This was the first time for me to see Jyothika, which is hardly surprising considering this was the only Hindi film she ever made. These days she can be seen mainly in Tamil films, though she’s made appearances in other languages as well.
What I most loved about her on screen is that I totally understood why the hero might be so stricken with her. Although she has none of the glamour that I usually associate with leading ladies in Bollywood, there’s something so shy, soft and adorable about her that I really had no trouble believing the hero could fall in love at first sight.
Besides that, she put in a very subtle and nuanced performance – even the most melodramatic scenes have a lot of restraint.
I loved Akshaye Khanna in this as well. It’s a very early role of his, but you can see he was already a very conscious performer. When he’s at his best, he really adds in a lot of detail. In the beating scenes, for example, his sidekicks are just acting out being hit, whereas he’s also playing out what’s going through Inder’s head – stuff like wondering where the next punch is going to come from.
I’m happy to have seen another romance with Akshaye Khanna where the chemistry between him and the heroine really works. Maybe I’m just being fussy, but in most of the films I’ve seen, I’ve not liked his romantic chemistry much. Not only that, but this is the first time I’ve liked his chemistry with a leading lady that is very shy and delicate rather than strong and forceful. There’s really a lot of beautifully tender and awkward moments between them.
Anupam Kher shows off why he’s so well respected as an actor. There are some really tender father-son scenes between him and Akshaye Khanna. I particularly liked the melodramatic one when he sees Inder after a really bad beating. It’s a shame that Anupam Kher’s role really isn’t written that well – the father’s actions feel very inconsistent and good acting can only go so far to fix those problems.
Amrish Puri is in a completely non-villainous role for once (he is a fisherman, the father of one of Inder’s friends), which is really weird but interesting. One thing that comes across is how powerful his on-screen presence is. In some ways I appreciate that even more seeing him in a role like this.
Paresh Rawal is somebody who I’ve really warmed up to during my Akshaye Khanna retrospective (they star opposite each other a lot). He’s at his best when he gets to do a lot nuance, which he has quite a bit of in this film. As Pallavi’s oldest brother he juggles a deep love for his sister with a deep dislike of Inder and rage at his sister when she falls for Inder anyway. Again, the writing is the not the most graceful at handling some of the contradictory things he does, but IMO you can see Paresh Rawal’s class as an actor all the same.
The two mothers (Moushumi Chatterjee and Aruna Irani) of the hero and heroine also put in good performances, though they are both rather on the sidelines for most of the film.

Overall, this is probably not exactly a great film, but it happens to totally rub me the right way and it does have some interesting things about it. It flopped when it originally came out and many people seem to hate it, but there is a small group of people (that clearly includes me) who absolutely love it.

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36 China Town (India, 2006)

My rating: +1 (Enjoyed it) – but only because Akshaye Khanna is in it *sigh*
Bechdel Test:
1 out of 3
Director: Abbas Alibhai Burmawalla, Mastan Alibhai Burmawalla
Cast
: Akshaye Khanna, Kareena Kapoor, Shahid Kapoor, Paresh Rawal, Payal Rohatgi, Johnny Lever, Tanaaz Currim Irani, Isha Koppikar, Upen Patel, Vivek Shaq, Rajendranath Zutshi, Priyanka Chopra (cameo)
Plot: A crime movie with a very heavy dose of comedy about a murder investigation in Goa’s Chinatown

About the film

I am going through a serious Akshaye Khanna fixation at the moment and since for the first time such a fixation has happened to me in the UK, where legal access to Bollywood films is fairly easy, I have been obsessively going through his filmography.

36 Chinatown isn’t really the best of films (it didn’t do particularly well in the box office either AFAIK), but it has stuck with me more so than some of the other films I’ve watched in my Akshaye Khanna mini-retrospective. This is because I really love his performance in this.
He plays the police detective investigating the murder. The whole point of his character is to be as ridiculously macho as possible and make all the other characters very uncomfortable the moment he appears on screen. I’ve really wanted to see a film where he has a very domineering sort of screen presence, so this made me very happy.
But it gets even better than that… I don’t know if I’m imagining this, but to me it seems like part of his intimidation tactics is to come on to his male suspects, so they’re even more uncomfortable. It’s very, very subtle and yet the body language, the winking, the unbuttoned shirt, the facial expressions… there’s something about this role that’s very sexual and it’s definitely not directed at the female characters.
The most suggestive bit IMO, happens towards the end of the movie. He tells all the suspects that he’s looking for one final piece of evidence and then he’ll know which one of them will be sent to the gallows. Then he tells them there’s a festival going on in China Town and he wants all of them to go out and enjoy themselves in the meantime (obviously they’re all too nervous to want to do so). And that’s when this song happens:

There’s no subtitles on the video, but in case you’re wondering, the line he’s singing for most of the song (while glaring at male characters) is “I’m interested in you”.
Nor is the song the only part of the movie that I find suggestive. There are other small moments in the dialogue scenes. Like the bit when he tells one of the suspects that he has some bracelets for him, takes out a pair of handcuffs and winks at him.
There’s even a scene at the end where the line he says is in that vein. One of the murder suspects is a playboy, who uses really bad pick up lines on any pretty woman he meets (married ones included) and should they respond positively, takes them on what he calls “long drives”. At the end, when the playboy tries to pick up yet another woman, the police detective gets involved in the conversation and teasingly offers a “long drive” to the playboy.
The character itself is most definitely straight, so I’m not suggesting there’s any real attempt at portraying homosexuality in this film – far from it. If it’s even there (I’m still not convinced I’m not simply imagining it), then it’s only there as a device to make the scenes look that little bit more uncomfortable and funny.

Gay innuendo and Akshaye Khanna aside, there’s not much more I really like about this film.
It’s unusually short – at just 2h 14min. it is probably the shortest commercial Hindi movie I’ve ever watched. It still manages to squeeze in 5 dance sequences (which is probably the standard number of songs in a Bollywood film nowadays), though one of them is during the ending credits.
It has an absolutely huge ensemble of characters. This abundance of characters makes for an interesting murder investigation (oh so many suspects), but it also brings in a fair share of problems. With that amount of characters, very little screen time remains for each of them and all of them suffer – particularly (oh so predictably) the female ones.
There are five female characters which drive the plot (and if we’re counting named ones we could probably add 1 or 2 onto that), which is a lot more than in most movies. Even with that many female characters it fails the Bechdel test completely – I don’t remember a single conversation between two female characters (even in a group scene). There are, naturally, plenty of conversations between men. That tells you a lot about how little focus the stories of the female characters get.

The resolution (i.e. who actually murdered) is quite predictable (turned out to be the character I suspected from the very beginning) and while there are some funny scenes and ideas, I found the comedy a bit heavy-handed most of the time. The romance between Raj (Shahid Kapoor) and Priya (Kareena Kapoor) felt rather tiresome to me. I think it would have been funnier (and much more original) had they not fallen in love and simply remained at each other’s throats for the whole duration of the murder investigation. And the production quality isn’t particularly high either.

On the positive side of things, Priyanka Chopra has a really great (and very funny) cameo at the end. It’s actually amazing how much screen presence she has.

And I did love how they dealt with India’s short-lived smoking ban. The ban made it illegal for Indian films to show smoking on screen because it supposedly makes it look cool and influences people to take up smoking. It only lasted a few years though. It was essentially censorship, and as is often the case, people always come up with ingenious ways to get around it or simply challenge it.
There was a film with Amitabh Bachchan soon after the ban came into place where they simply blatantly disregarded the ban. Then there was Don, which showed the smoke coming out of the main character’s mouth, but never showed the cigarette itself, while adding lines said in a very over the top way about how smoking kills you.
But I think this film’s way around the ban may be my favourite yet. The police detective keeps trying to light up a cigarette, but the lighter keeps failing – either no flame appears at all or the flame is way too big. And then at the end when the police detective almost succeeds in lighting his cigarette, they hilariously put up a sign about how smoking is injurious to health.

Overall, this is probably not a film I would particularly recommend, but I did find it a very pleasant way to satisfy some of my Akshaye Khanna fixation.

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Aakrosh (India, 2010)

My rating: +2 (Loved it)
Bechdel Test:
3 out of 3 but only just
Director: Priyadarshan
Cast: Ajay Devgan, Akshaye Khanna, Bipasha Basu, Reema Sen, Paresh Rawal
Plot: An investigation of the disappearance of three students takes place in a small and very uncooperative Indian village. The film handles the subject of honour killings and caste issues.

About the film

Aakrosh is an unusual mix of things. On the one hand, it’s a film with a very strong social conscience. On the other it’s also a commercial thriller with a few very spectacular (and very unrealistic) chase scenes. It has a lot of violence too and somehow manages to be fairly naturalistic and yet still make a bit of a spectacle out of all the fighting. And since it’s a Bollywood film, it also has dancing, though not a lot of it.

To me, first and foremost it’s a very beautiful movie. The cinematography and editing made a huge impression on me. It’s a very mobile camera with a good mix of some very wide and spectacular shots of large groups of people, as well as many naturalistic shots that get close to the actors. To me the way it was shot and put together, really is a thing of great beauty.
But its beauty aside, it has much to recommend it storywise as well. In India, even in this day and age, you can still get killed because you fall in love with a person with a different social standing to yourself. This is the true subject matter of the film, though all this is packed into the formula of a thriller. Even if the social theme doesn’t interest you, it’s still perfectly possible to enjoy the film simply as a good thriller. It has many good twists and turns, but perhaps the best bit for me was the ending. Maybe not the most realistic of endings, but I really liked it and totally didn’t see it coming!

This is only the second of Priyadarshan’s films I’ve watched and apparently quite an unusual one for him (it seems that usually he makes purely commercial films without a social message). But something that strikes me is that he seems very good at observing people. There’s something very real about how he portrays human behaviour and the style of camerawork in this film really helps in that.
Aakrosh portrays the different levels of Indian society with a lot of subtlety. Different castes are one thing, but there are also the differences between big cities and villages and many other power disbalances such as age or occupation. The way the police work, the way corruption works, the way the villagers stay silent despite it all – all of that is portrayed very beautifully and believably.
And then there is gender. The events of the film happen very much in the world of men. Small villages in India seem to be places where women are not seen much outside the home and they rarely speak when in male company. Seeing as the two main characters (the investigators of the case of the disappearance of the 3 students) are male, they don’t interact much with women.
It was quite a surprise to me that the film passes the Bechdel test – this is solely thanks to the interactions that happen later on in the movie between Geeta (a battered wife in an upper caste home, played by Bipasha Basu) and Jamunia (a lower caste woman who loses her family through the events of the film, portrayed by Reema Sen). The reality is that for these women a lot of their lives do revolve around the men in their lives, so men are much of what they talk about. But I think arguably when Geeta inquires about Jamunia’s situation after she loses her husband and son, she is not really inquiring about the men in Jamunia’s life but Jamunia herself. The relationship and interactions between them turn out to be extremely important for how the plot develops in the end – this was something I had not expected, I was expecting it all to play out between the men.

The cast has some bigger Bollywood names (Ajay Devgan, Akshaye Khanna and Bipasha Basu), but they are amongst the subtler Bollywood stars, so Aakrosh has a slightly more realistic feel without as much of the bigger than life acting that Bollywood usually serves up. All three of them turn in good performances.
Ajay Devgan is Pratap, an investigator from the village assigned to help out in the CBI’s (Central Bureau of Investigation) work. He is a lower caste man, who has tried to get an education and make a decent life for himself despite having the cards stacked against him and having some truly haunting stories in his past. He genuinely wants to help and has a personal motive since Dinu, the missing boy from the village, is low caste like Pratap himself (the other two students are better connected boys from the city, who came to the village with Dinu). But he is also quite sceptical about whether the investigation will come up with anything since he knows first hand how the village works and how difficult it will be to get information from anyone. As the investigation develops, some of the things that happen are very, very personal to Pratap.
Ajay Devgan is well cast here – the tough, suffering, low caste man is something I’ve seen him do very well before. He’s a good balance of action hero and real man off the street – perfect for this kind of film.
Akshaye Khanna (who I am a big fan of and who is partly responsible for me seeing this :D) is Siddhant. Siddhant is a Brahmin (the highest caste) from Delhi with a rather privileged life – a soft-spoken young man with a respectable job whose mum is arranging his marriage while he investigates the case.
Siddhant is the designated investigator from the CBI with a good track record of handling difficult cases. Still, he has no idea about village politics and greatly underestimates the difficulties of investigating a case like this. Pratap has his doubts about Siddhant, but it soon becomes clear Siddhant is very determined. They don’t always see eye to eye (especially when things get personal for Pratap), but they make a good team. Siddhant blunders through initially, but slowly gets better at playing the village politics game.
Again, this is really good casting – Akshaye Khanna is believable both as a soft-spoken clerk and as a man who has just enough temper and machoismo that he could end up in a fist fight.

Overall, I highly recommend the film to anybody who likes a good thriller or a beautifully shot film on a serious topic.

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